Physiology and Biophysics (PHZB)

PHZB 602. Physiological Concepts for General Life Sciences2 Units

Description: This course covers the fundamental function of membranes; autonomic (ANS), hypothalamic, and central (CNS) neural control; and for integrated function of muscle, heart, circulatory, renal, endocrine, reproduction, and gastrointestinal organ systems. Emphasis is placed on physiological mechanisms for integrated feedback control of organ and tissue function in humans. Overall, this course offers a solid basis in physiological concepts for post-baccalaureate life-science graduate students to enhance their advanced studies of life sciences. This course teaches by combined didactic lecture and student problem-solving class sessions, and by concept-problem reviews. This course is offered only on a letter-grade basis. The Course Faculty reserves the right to make changes in this syllabus when necessary to meet learning objectives and course management.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHZB 604. Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall Only

Prerequisite(s): Permission from course director.

Description: This course will provide a comprehensive overview on this intriguing and highly debated topic. The course will focus on the biology of stem cells and their role in health and disease with emphasis on development, carcinogenesis and tissue engineering. Lectures on various aspects of stem cells from renowned experts will cover both embryonic, induced pluripotent and adult stem cells. Specific lectures will include stem cell types present in the blood, liver, brain, muscle, kidney, pancreas, prostate, lung, gut, skin, and eye. Fellows/graduate students will also be educated on therapeutic cloning as well as bio-ethical issues and existing laws governing stem cell research.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHZB 605. Systemic Physiology I5 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admitted into SIGS.

Description: The first of two human physiology courses that are offered the first year of the graduate programs in the Department of Physiology and Biophysics and other basic science departments at the SOM. This course contains four lectures and one hour of recitation/application of the preceding four lectures per week. Mandatory attendance is required for all class sessions.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHZB 606. Systemic Physiology II5 Units

Prerequisite(s): Admitted into SIGS.

Description: The second of two human physiology courses that are offered the first year of the graduate programs in the Department of Physiology and Biophysics. This course contains four lectures and one hour of recitation/application of the preceding four lectures per week. Mandatory attendance is required for all class sessions.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHZB 607. Principles of Presentations: Self, Science, Interviews3 Units

Description: This course will provide instruction in best practices for oral-based presentations. There will be multiple oral presentation topics covered, including: Basic Presentations; Using Visual Aids, Charts and Figures; Distilling and Presenting a Clear and Understandable Hypothesis and Specific Aims; Interviews; and Scientific Poster Presentations. Students will attend lectures, participate in small group discussions and present five different types of oral-based presentations. A mid-term and final exam (each 50% of overall grade) will be used to assess student understanding of the knowledge centered on making clear, concise and purposeful oral presentations.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHZB 609. Integrated Systemic Physiology3 Units

Prerequisite(s): PHY 601 or PHZB 601 and consent of instructor.

Description: Designed to provide reinforcement, expansion and integration of basic physiologic concepts of human organ systems.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHZB 611. Advanced Human Cardiovascular Physiology3 Units

Prerequisite(s): PHZB 605 or consent of instructor.

Description: PHZB 611 utilizes lectures on the physiological and biochemical processes in the heart, blood vessels and blood elements to provide more detailed mechanisms from molecular to systematic levels and normal to pathological states.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHZB 615. Clinical Physiology6 Units

Prerequisite(s): PHZB 605 & PHZB 606.

Description: This is a 6-credit hour course that uses clinical situations to examine and reinforce mechanisms important to understanding systemic physiology. There are six areas covered: 1) electrical functioning of the heart, 2) blood pressure and circulatory control mechanisms, 3) ventilation and perfusion of the lungs, 4) gastrointestinal blood flow and acid production, 5) blood flow and oxygen utilization by the heart, and 6) control of the many endocrine functions. This course utilizes a combination of faculty-lead teaching techniques that include: team based learning (TBL), problem based learning (PBL), and in-class exercises. All course materials have been prepared by the supervising faculty and will be available to students online as needed.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHZB 616. Selected Topics in Physiology and Biophysics1-12 Units

Description: Detailed discussion of physiological and biophysical problems of particular interest to students and staff. Topics will be announced in the schedule.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHZB 617. Seminar in Physiology and Biophysics1 Unit

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PHZB 619. Research1-20 Units

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PHZB 620. Thesis1-6 Units

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PHZB 625. Experimental Physiology Methods1 Unit

Prerequisite(s): Admitted into SIGS.

Description: Experimental Physiology Methods is a first course available to matriculating students in the initial year of graduate physiology programs. This course is designed to broadly introduce the use of the scientific methods on studying hypothesis-related research in physiology. This course is now designed to be taken by all matriculating graduate students, but only 1 credit hour (instead of the previous listing for 3). Beginning doctoral students will take this course in concurrence with the general "methods course" by the Interdepartmental Programs in Basic Science each fall semester.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHZB 630. Biomedical Applications of Physiology in the Eye3 Units

Description: This course gives the basic physics and advanced physiologic principles that relate to function of the eye as an organ system, uncovers the physics behind basic instruments used for diagnostics of eye health, introduces the student to various professions that are involved in eye health, and discusses the biomedical aspects of several problems that are frequently encountered in medical eye health. Overall, this course offers a solid background in physiology, pathophysiology, measurements methods, and biomedical aspects of the eye to well-prepare a student for pursuit of a career in professions related to eye health.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHZB 799. Dissertation1-12 Units

Prerequisite(s): Permission of departmental chair.

Description: The terminal research course for the PhD degree to finalize data analyses and manuscript preparation for the doctoral dissertation.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes