Psychology (PSYC)

PSYC 201. Introduction to Psychology - SB3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Description: Introduction to the methods and major content areas of psychology: sensation, perception, learning, cognition, human development, abnormal and social psychology.

Note: Students are required to participate in one or more standard experiments or to submit abstracts of published studies as part of PSYC 201.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 202. Orientation to the Psychology Major/Careers in Psychology1 Unit

Term Typically Offered: Occasionally Offered

Description: An orientation to 1) the psychology major and its requirements at UofL and 2) the field of psychology and its career options. Designed to enhance students' opportunities within this field through development of an action plan that guides their experiences while completing their degree at UofL.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 205. Making Sense of Data - QR3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall Only

Prerequisite(s): Appropriate placement score or equivalent coursework.

Description: Students will learn about the nature of scientific inquiry, how to tell good science from bad science, how to think critically about using data to support or undermine persuasive massages, how to find and assess the quality of scientific reports to answer their questions, and how to science-specifically studying human behavior-is meaningful in their everyday lives. The uses and misuses of descriptive statistics, the graphic representation of data, the role of bias, and the evaluation of behavioral science reports will be major topics.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 301. Statistics for Psychology3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201; MATH 111 (or equivalent) or above.

Description: Elementary statistical methods as applied in the social sciences: probability; distribution (theoretical and empirical), statistics and parameters; sampling; tests of hypotheses including ANOVA; regression and correlation; contingency.

Note: Students may not receive credit for both this course and SOC 301, CJ 326 (formerly JA 326), BSTA 201, MATH 109, BIOL 350.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 302. Research Methods for Psychology3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201; MATH 111 (or equivalent) or higher; PSYC 301.

Description: Introduction to scientific methods in psychology: formulation of hypotheses, design of experiments, execution of experiments, analysis of data, communication of results.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 305. Brain and Behavior3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201.

Description: The course will focus on relationships between brain function and human behavior. It will introduce the structures, systems, and methods by which human behavior is reflected in neural activity. It will examine how nerve cells function individually and work together; the structure of the nervous system; how our sense organs provide the nervous system with information about the outside world; how the brain controls movement; and how sleep, eating, sex, stress, and social interaction are represented in the brain. We will also investigate how the nervous system is influenced by bioactive substances including natural hormones (e.g., during a response to stress), pharmacological therapeutics, and recreational drugs.

Note: Students who have previous credit for PSYC 344 cannot earn credit for this course.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 306. Life Span Developmental Psychology3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201.

Description: A review of human growth and development across the lifespan. This course examines physical, cognitive, and socioemotional development from conception through old age. This course is relevant for students in psychology, neuroscience, communicative disorders, education, nursing, and public health.

Note: Students cannot receive credit for this course and also PSYC 363 or PSYC 365.
Note: Previously taught as PSYC 363.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 307. Cognitive Processes3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201.

Description: Survey of theory and research on cognition, i.e., thinking, concept attainment, memory, language, creativity, problem solving, and decision-making.

Note: Previously taught as PSYC 322.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 308. Abnormal Psychology3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201.

Description: An introduction to taxonomy, nature, causes, and treatments of maladjusted behavior.

Note: Previously taught as PSYC 385.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 310. Psychology of Diversity3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Occasionally Offered

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201 or consent of instructor.

Description: Exploration of psychological processes as they relate to interactions between diverse individuals and groups. Pertinent psychological processes include perspective taking, belief updating, creativity, identity formation, stereotyping and prejudice. Diversity will be broadly construed to encompass many dimensions along which individuals and groups differ, such as race, gender, sexuality, religiosity, physical ability, mental health, conservatism/progressivism, collectivism/individualism and socioeconomic status.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 314. Reasoning and Decision-Making3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Spring Only

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201.

Description: How do people make decisions that impact their lives and the world? This course is an introduction to reasoning and decision science, including psychological, economic, ethical and political perspectives on decision-making. Students will explore decision-making in everyday life, politics, the economy, medicine, sports and the environment, with an emphasis on sustainability issues and social outcomes. This is an active, collaborative learning course with group discussions and problem-solving, as well as brief lectures. This course is relevant to students interested in all social sciences, business management, behavioral economics, health care, sustainability, political science, public health and policy, and law.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 320. Exercise Psychology3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Occasionally Offered

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201.

Description: This course provides an introduction to a) psychological principles affecting exercise initiation and maintenance; and b) psychological outcomes of physical activity and exercise related to mental and physical health. It is an interdisciplinary course integrating Psychology and Exercise Science. It is relevant for students interested in medicine, wellness, education, sports and biology as well as psychology.

Note: Previously taught as PSYC 450.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 321. Conditioning, Learning and Behavior3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201.

Description: Psychologists define learning as a relatively permanent change in an organism's behavior due to experience. This course examines the basic processes of human and animal learning, focusing on classical and operant conditioning observational learning, and biological predispositions. This course address applications of the theoretical and empirical literature, including behavior change and analysis.

Note: This course does not directly address issues of school teaching practice.
Note: Students who have previously taken PSYC 321 cannot get credit for this course.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 325. Health Psychology3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall Only

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201.

Description: Survey of the interconnected nature of biological, psychological and social aspects of health and an evidence-based way of thinking about these relationships. Course topics include historical and recent foundations of health psychology, stress and lifestyle and health, chronic and life-threatening diseases and treatment seeking and approaches. This course is relevant for students in psychology, pre-health professions, exercise science, public health, and other physical and mental health related disciplines.

Note: Cannot earn credit for this course and also PSYC 481 or 581.
Note: Cross-listed with PSYC 581.
Note: Previously taught as PSYC 481.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 331. Sensation and Perception3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201.

Description: This course examines how we perceive our environment through visual, auditory, tactile, olfactory, and taste modalities, and how perception sculpts our experience of the world around us. The course emphasizes identifying the structures and discussing the processes underlying perception. Topics covered include psychophysics (the quantitative measurement of perceptual experience), the anatomical structure of the eye, ear, tongue, nose, and skin, structures and functions of the nervous system, abnormalities in perception as results of aging or injury, commonalities and differences across modalities, and our psychological experience of perception. This course is relevant for students in psychology, neuroscience, communicative disorders, anatomy, and otolaryngology.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 342. Drugs and Behavior3 Units

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201 or consent of instructor.

Description: Consideration of the physiological and psychological effects of drugs of social interest and the social impact of their abuse.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 344. Physiological Psychology3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201 or BIOL 240 or consent of instructor.

Description: An introduction to the physiological and anatomical bases of behavior.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 355. Neuroscience3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201, PSYC 305 or PSYC 344; or permission of instructor.

Description: This course provides a deeper dive into the field of neuroscience as a follow-up course to PSYC 305, with more detailed study of the structure and function of the nervous system, covering topics such as neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, brain development and plasticity, hormonal systems, motor function, biorhythms, homeostatic systems, emotion and psychopathology. This course is relevant to students interested in biology, medicine, engineering, rehabilitation, philosophy and public health, as well as psychology and neuroscience.

Note: Students cannot receive credit for this course and PSYC 443.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 365. Child Development3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall Only

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201.

Description: Survey of theories and research about development from infancy through childhood.

Note: Students may not receive credit for both this course and also either PSYC 306 or PSYC 363.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 366. Multicultural Psychology 3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Occasionally Offered

Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor and approved major in either Psychology or Pan-African Studies with at least 90 hours of degree-applicable credit.

Description: The influences of race, gender, class and sexual bias in American society and its impact on individual psychology as well as on economically and socially-marginalized groups.

Note: Approved for the College of Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR).

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 372. Social Psychology3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201 or consent of instructor.

Description: Major topics relevant to people as social beings; social learning and personality development, social influences in perception and cognition, interpersonal communication and influence, small group behavior, and mass behavior.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 375. Personality3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201 or consent of instructor.

Description: A review of major personality theories in terms of experimental and clinical findings.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 378. Understanding Measurement and Testing in Psychology3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall Only

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 301.

Description: This class teaches students about the way tests and other measurement approaches are developed and evaluated, and provides a basic survey of how tests are used to assess important psychological constructs such as ability, personality, and psychopathology.

Note: Previously taught as PSYC 313.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 382. Cognitive Neuroscience3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall Only

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201; PSYC 305 or PSYC 344; or instructor permission.

Description: Cognitive neuroscience combines tools and theories from cognitive science, neuropsychology, and computational modeling to understand the neural basis for functions like seeing, hearing, remembering, acting, and speaking. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to understand, evaluate, and communicate newsworthy findings from cognitive neuroscience research. This course is particularly relevant to students who plan to pursue health or science-related careers.

Note: Previously taught as PSYC 422.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 383. Forensic Psychology3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Description: Areas of inquiry in which both psychological and legal aspects are important: insanity defenses, criminality, courtroom process, methods of deception, detection.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 388. Principles of Clinical Psychology3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall Only

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201; PSYC 308 or PSYC 385; or permission of instructor.

Description: Examines the history, theoretical foundations, and methods of clinical psychology. Emphasis on areas of clinical practice, along with understanding how basic research methods are employed to explore clinical questions and support clinical practice.

Note: Cannot earn credit for this course and also PSYC 482 or PSYC 582.
Note: Previously taught as PSYC 482.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 400. Psychology Research and Public Communication 3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Occasionally Offered

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201, PSYC 301, PSYC 302 and consent of instructor; completion of or concurrent enrollment in PSYC 401.

Description: This course will focus on issues surrounding the interpretation and dissemination of psychological concepts and findings. Topics will include the critical analysys of "psychological myths" and how to write and speak about psychology for general audiences. Case studies and in-class activities will be used to illustrate the benefits and challenges of accurately portraying psychological research to the public. The content of the seminar projects will come from each students research experience the PSYC 401.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 404. Seminar in Psychology1-4 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor.

Description: Topics which are timely or of interest to specialized groups. Credit varies, as listed each semester in the Schedule of Courses.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 407. Community Internships in Psychology 3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201, PSYC 301 and PSYC 302; or consent of instructor; 2.75 overall GPA.

Description: On-site formal training and community-based research and/or service with select non-profit agencies. Sites are chosen based on special topics/social issues and programs in applied developmental psychology.

Course Attribute(s): CUE - This course fulfills the Culminating Undergraduate Experience (CUE) requirement for certain degree programs. CUE courses are advanced-level courses intended for majors with at least 90 earned credits/senior-level status.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 408. International Service Learning and Research 6 Units

Term Typically Offered: Spring, Summer

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201, PSYC 301, PSYC 302, and PSYC 404 (spring term prior to departure).

Description: Off-campus international travel and field research/service learning project, which serves as a culminating undergraduate experience, while infusing critical thinking skills and fostering a meaningful community engagement experience. This course is intended to expose students to psychological theories and empirical research while working directly with a faculty member's research project. Application and program fee required.

Course Attribute(s): CUE - This course fulfills the Culminating Undergraduate Experience (CUE) requirement for certain degree programs. CUE courses are advanced-level courses intended for majors with at least 90 earned credits/senior-level status.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 410. Giving Psychology Away: Critical Thinking and Public Communication 3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall Only

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201, PSYC 301, PSYC 302 and consent of instructor.

Description: Discussion of issues surrounding the dissemination of psychological concepts and findings. Participation in public presentation is required.

Course Attribute(s): CUE - This course fulfills the Culminating Undergraduate Experience (CUE) requirement for certain degree programs. CUE courses are advanced-level courses intended for majors with at least 90 earned credits/senior-level status.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 412. Modifying Behavior 3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Occasionally Offered

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201, PSYC 301 and PSYC 302; 24 credit hours in Psychology or senior standing; approval in the Psychology major; or permission of the instructor.

Description: This course will require mastery of behavior modification theory and techniques, and their application to the real world problems. Because behavior modification requires the systemic application of learning principles and basic research methodology skills, the course will require students to synthesize and apply information/concepts from previous psychology courses.

Course Attribute(s): CUE - This course fulfills the Culminating Undergraduate Experience (CUE) requirement for certain degree programs. CUE courses are advanced-level courses intended for majors with at least 90 earned credits/senior-level status.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 414. Seminar in Psychology 2-4 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor.

Description: Topics which are timely or of interest to specialized groups. Credit varies, as listed each semester in the Schedule of Courses.

Note: Approved for the Arts and Sciences Upper-Level Requirement in written communication-WR.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 415. Family Risk, Resilience and Mindfulness 3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Occasionally Offered

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201, PSYC 301, and PSYC 302; 24 credit hours in Psychology or Senior standing; approved major in Psychology; or permission of instructor.

Description: The three units of the semester are as follows: (1) Risk Factors, (2) Resilience, and (3) Mindfulness, and each major topic will be addressed for parents, children and the family unit. We will discuss the current scientific literature on such risk factors as poverty, divorce and single parenting, homelessness, mental and physical health issues, nutrition, family and neighborhood violence, and trauma (to include trauma-informed care). The current evidence base on the science of resilience (what is it, how it's demonstrated and how to promote it), and the practice and benefits of mindfulness for parents/children will complete the semester.

Note: Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR).

Course Attribute(s): CUE - This course fulfills the Culminating Undergraduate Experience (CUE) requirement for certain degree programs. CUE courses are advanced-level courses intended for majors with at least 90 earned credits/senior-level status.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 420. History of Psychology: A Socio Cultural Perspective 3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Occasionally Offered

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201, PSYC 301 and PSYC 302; 24 credit hours in Psychology or Senior standing; approval in the Psychology major; or permission of the instructor.

Description: This course is designed as an overview and synthesis of the history of psychology and how this historical background has led to the development of the systems and issues of contemporary psychology. We will explore how the major historical roots and theoretical contributions led to the development of psychology as a scientific discipline. Emphasis will be on how current psychological perspectives have evolved to be more inclusive to women and minorities and the sociocultural context of this evolution.

Course Attribute(s): CUE - This course fulfills the Culminating Undergraduate Experience (CUE) requirement for certain degree programs. CUE courses are advanced-level courses intended for majors with at least 90 earned credits/senior-level status.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 430. Psychology of Peace & Ethnic Relations 3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Occasionally Offered

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201, PSYC 301 (or equivalent), and PSYC 302; 90 credit hours; approved Psychology major or consent of instructor.

Description: This course is intended to expose students to the theories, research, and psychosocial elements of peacebuilding as they relate to interethnic relations around the world. Empirical readings and discussion will focus on race, ethnicity, identity formation, intergroup contact, spectrum of intergroup relations (e.g., expulsion, genocide, segregation, fusion, assimilation, and pluralism), restorative practices, and peacebuilding in a multicultural world.

Course Attribute(s): CUE - This course fulfills the Culminating Undergraduate Experience (CUE) requirement for certain degree programs. CUE courses are advanced-level courses intended for majors with at least 90 earned credits/senior-level status.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 432. Vision and Art3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201 or permission of instructor.

Description: This course covers how humans see, illustrated in the context of visual art. Topics include light, neural processing, visual abilities and how those influence painters and the perception of paintings.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 433. Music Perception and Cognition 3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Spring Only

Prerequisite(s): 90 credit hours; Psychology major; PSYC 301, PSYC 302 and PSYC 331; or permission of instructor.

Description: This course provides an overview of the perceptual, cognitive, emotional, and neural bases of listening to music. Why does music have such strong ties to emotion? What are the parallels between music and language? What are the neuroscientific underpinnings of music perception and cognition? What does musical training do to your brain, and what other talents or skills do you acquire through musical training? This course is designed for majors in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, and does not require any coursework or other background in music.

Note: Students may not receive credit for both PSYC 433 and MUTH 301.

Course Attribute(s): CUE - This course fulfills the Culminating Undergraduate Experience (CUE) requirement for certain degree programs. CUE courses are advanced-level courses intended for majors with at least 90 earned credits/senior-level status.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 435. Seminar in Infancy 3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Occasionally Offered

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201, PSYC 301, PSYC 302 and PSYC 363.

Description: This course will cover concepts, empirical research, and issues related to infants' cognitive, perceptual, social, emotional, linguistic and/or physical development.

Note: Specific topics may vary.
Note: Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR).

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 440. Aging: Science and Stories 3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Spring Only

Prerequisite(s): 90 credit hours; Psychology major; PSYC 301 and PSYC 302.

Description: The purpose of this course is to help students understand aging through scientific research and the lived experiences of individuals, and to better understand how these perspectives might differ from one another. Students will become familiar with current aging issues (e.g., cognitive aging, social and emotional aging, mental health, and Alzheimer's disease), research methods, theories and perspectives on aging and its diversity. Students will learn how to conduct life reviews with older people and integrate these stories with scientific perspective on aging. The course requires student reflection and critical thinking about (l) how scientific evidence fits with and differs from the subjective experiences of older people and (2) how this relates to their personal aging and life story.

Note: Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communicatin (WR).

Course Attribute(s): CUE - This course fulfills the Culminating Undergraduate Experience (CUE) requirement for certain degree programs. CUE courses are advanced-level courses intended for majors with at least 90 earned credits/senior-level status.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 444. Exploration of Self: Theory and Research 3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Occasionally Offered

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201, PSYC 301, PSYC 302, and PSYC 375; accepted Psychology major with Senior standing.

Description: We are all subject to distortions in our understanding of ourselves due to cognitive biases and conscious and unconscious processes. This class will draw knowledge gained in prior psychology courses to study theories of self focusing on how we collect information about conscious and unconscious selves, hands-on generation of personality data, and the use of these self-generated data to compare competing theories of self. The course will require understanding and using the empirical tools of psychological science and the ability to defend and critique multiple points of view. This course represents a culminating undergraduate experience.

Note: Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR).

Course Attribute(s): CUE - This course fulfills the Culminating Undergraduate Experience (CUE) requirement for certain degree programs. CUE courses are advanced-level courses intended for majors with at least 90 earned credits/senior-level status.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 445. Special Topics in Neuroscience 3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201; PSYC 305 or PSYC 344; and PSYC 355 or PSYC 443; or permission of instructor.

Description: A seminar course providing in-depth treatment of an area of current interest in the discipline of neuroscience. Students will read, discuss and write reflections on original published works in the field.

Note: Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR).
Note: Previously taught as PSYC 443.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 451. Introduction to Computer Programming for Psychology3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall Only

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 301.

Description: Introduction to the use of the MATLAB programming language in psychology. No prior knowledge of programming languages is assumed.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 466. Psychology of Women3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Spring Only

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201.

Description: Analysis of scientific research and theory related to the psychology of women. Multiple theoretical perspectives will be considered (e.g., psychodynamic, social learning, cognitive, evolutionary, developmental, etc.) and specific topics evaluated will include: identity development, achievement, motherhood, work, family, aging, and menopause, etc. Ethnicity, culture, and social class will be considered in the context of specific topics.

Note: Cross-listed with WGST 411.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 471. Special Topics in Psychology3 Units

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201 and permission of instructor.

Description: Survey and analysis of current theory, research and application in a specialized topic of current interest.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 485. Stress and Trauma 3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 301 and PSYC 302; PSYC 344 or PSYC 385.

Description: Introduction to traumatic stress research. Topics will include psychological theories of stress and trauma, the biology of stress and trauma, and risk factors for developing psychological problems subsequent to experiencing trauma.

Note: Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR).

Course Attribute(s): CUE - This course fulfills the Culminating Undergraduate Experience (CUE) requirement for certain degree programs. CUE courses are advanced-level courses intended for majors with at least 90 earned credits/senior-level status.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 490. Independent Study1-3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201 and consent of instructor.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 491. Undergraduate Psychology Research1-3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201 and consent of instructor.

Description: Designing of experiments, collection of data, and statistical treatment.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 492. Undergraduate Psychology Research 3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Occasionally Offered

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201, PSYC 301, and PSYC 302; 27 credit hours in Psychology or Senior standing; approved Psychology major; or permission of instructor.

Description: An independent study class involving research on a focused topic in Psychology. Students register for individual sections of PSYC 492 after contacting a faculty mentor and arriving at an agreed-upon course of work for the semester. Each psychology research experience is unique to the particular student and faculty research lab in which it occurs.

Course Attribute(s): CUE - This course fulfills the Culminating Undergraduate Experience (CUE) requirement for certain degree programs. CUE courses are advanced-level courses intended for majors with at least 90 earned credits/senior-level status.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 495. Honors Psychology Research1-3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into Psychology Honors Program.

Description: Designing of experiments, collection of data, statistical analysis, and report writing in support of the honors thesis.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 496. Honors Psychology Thesis 3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 491 or PSYC 495; admission to Psychology Honors, permission of instructor.

Description:

Note: Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR).

Course Attribute(s): CUE - This course fulfills the Culminating Undergraduate Experience (CUE) requirement for certain degree programs. CUE courses are advanced-level courses intended for majors with at least 90 earned credits/senior-level status.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 516. Introductory Mathematical Psychology3 Units

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201.

Description: Survey of basic applications of probability and mathematics to models and theories in learning, perception, and social psychology.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 524. Psycholinguistics3 Units

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 322 or LING 518.

Description: Psychological aspects of language and their significance for analysis and understanding of cognitive and social processes.

Note: Cross-listed with LING 524.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 544. Animal Behavior and Behavioral Ecology3 Units

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201 or consent of instructor.

Description: Survey of sensory and behavioral characteristics of animal species, with stress upon ecological variables.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 566. Race and Gender in Psychological Research3 Units

Description: Critical review of psychology with respect to issues of race and gender. Examines theory and research paradigms, modern, postmodern and Afrocentric methodologies.

Note: Cross-listed with PAS 566.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 571. Special Topics in Psychology3-4 Units

Term Typically Offered: Occasionally Offered

Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor.

Description: Survey and analysis of current theory, research and application in a specialized topic of current interest.

Note: Undergraduate, Psychology Honors, or graduate credit available with consent of instructor.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 581. Introduction to Health Psychology3 Units

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 201 or consent of instructor.

Description: Survey of theory and research on psychological factors which contribute to health and well-being, and to the occurrence, severity, and remediation of illness and disease.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PSYC 582. Introduction to Clinical Psychology3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Junior, Senior, or master's-level student with 9 or more credit hours in Psychology beyond PSYC 201.

Description: Examines the history, theoretical foundations, and methods of clinical psychology. Emphasis on areas of clinical practice, along with understanding how basic research methods are employed to explore clinical questions and support clinical practice.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes