Interdepartmental Courses (IDEP)

Subject-area course lists indicate courses currently active for offering at the University of Louisville. Not all courses are scheduled in any given academic term. For class offerings in a specific semester, refer to the Schedule of Classes.

Course Fees

Some courses may carry fees beyond the standard tuition costs to cover additional support or materials. Program-, subject- and course-specific fee information can be found on the Office of the Bursar website.


IDEP 811. Clinical Anatomy, Development, Examination and Neurosciences20.5 Units

Grading Basis: Pass/Fail

Description: The Clinical Anatomy, Development, Examination and Neuroscience course will train first-year medical students in the fundamental structures of the human body-its gross anatomy & neuroanatomy, development and methods of the clinical physical examinations. This is an integrated course that merges the disciplines of Gross Anatomy, Embryology, Physical Diagnosis and Neurosciences to help students understand the connections between these sciences from the earliest days of their training as physicians. This course teaches students some of the clinical skills required to enter the clinical years of medical school and the knowledge and behaviors needed to pursue a medical career of lifelong learning and patient care.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

IDEP 812. Molecular Basis of Life, Defense, and Disease15 Units

Grading Basis: Pass/Fail

Description: The goal of the course is to provide yearfirst- medical students a solid foundational understanding of the molecular basis of life highlighting mechanisms of immunity, defense and disease. The course will integrate the disciplines of biochemistry, genetics, histology, immunology, microbiology, pathology, pharmacology and physiology in first building a molecular foundation of life and then how these processes both protect humans from disease but also lead to disease when homeostatic mechanisms fail. Both basic science and clinical faculty will be involved in both designing the course including content, learning modalities and means of assessment. Upon completion of the course, students will be prepared to apply molecular concepts to pathophysiology of human disease & their effective treatments.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

IDEP 813. Systems in Health and Disease I18.5 Units

Grading Basis: Pass/Fail

Description: This course serves as an introduction to the normal cellular and tissue structure, physiology, diseases, pathology, infectious diseases, and drug treatments for each of the following organ systems: cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, male and female genitourinary, and endocrine.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

IDEP 814. Systems in Health and Disease II15 Units

Grading Basis: Pass/Fail

Description: This course serves as an introduction to the normal cellular and tissue structure, physiology, diseases, pathology, infectious diseases, and drug treatment for each of the following organ systems or functional areas: dermatologic, musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal, hepatobiliary/pancreatic exocrin, central and peripheral nervous, behavioral and mental, sexual health.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

IDEP 815. Introduction to Clinical Medicine I3 Units

Grading Basis: Pass/Fail

Description: This course seeks to teach the necessary skills, knowledge and attitudes for the successful practice of modern medicine. This course emphasizes core patient history-taking, as well as skills & behaviors related to medical professionalism, patient care documentation, cultural competency, health promotions & disease prevention & doctor-patient communication. Community-based shadowing/preceptorship experiences, longitudinal small group learning & patient continuity training are also required to complete this course.

Course Attribute(s): CBL - This course includes Community-Based Learning (CBL). Students will engage in a community experience or project with an external partner in order to enhance understanding and application of academic content.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

IDEP 816. Introduction to Clinical Medicine II3-3.5 Units

Grading Basis: Pass/Fail

Description: Required second-year course. This course is the second year of a cumulative, two-year course concerning the clinical application of medical sciences. The second-year course builds on the skills taken from the first year and is intended to provide a foundation for second-year students to develop skills in the patient encounter or doctor/patient relationship. The course also provides a foundation for study in biostatistics, epidemiology, and behavioral sciences. The course will require that students successfully complete an OSCE examination geared to second-year students at the end of the year. This course will contribute to the students' capacity for completing the USMLE Step 1 examination. At the completion of this course, students will be expected to accurately collect, record and report pertinent physical and biological data from adult patients and formulate problem lists and assessments; understand the manifestations and underlying dynamics of human behavioral diversity and apply that understanding as a basis for establishing a therapeutic patient-physician relationship; increase physician interpersonal skills and improve clinical diagnosis; apply skills and concepts learned in the behavioral sciences to better deal with the normal fears and anxiety that accompany medical illness; use the learned concepts in behavioral science and psychiatry to better deal with difficult patients and the stresses experienced by physician; and have an understanding of the doctor/patient relationship and human development.

Note: 3 1/2 credits fall; 3 credits spring.

Course Attribute(s): CBL - This course includes Community-Based Learning (CBL). Students will engage in a community experience or project with an external partner in order to enhance understanding and application of academic content.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

IDEP 834. Compassion Cultivation Training (CCT)2 Units

Description: Second-year elective. Compassion Cultivation Training (CCT) is designed to develop the qualities of compassion, empathy, and kindness for oneself and others. CCT integrates traditional contemplative practices with contemporary psychology and scientific research on compassion. Cultivating compassion goes beyond feeling more empathy and concern for others. It develops the strength to be with suffering, the courage to take compassionate action, and the resilience to prevent compassion fatigue. These qualities support a wide range of goals, from improving personal relationships to making a positive difference in the world. The process of cultivating compassion involves training our own minds, developing specific skills in how we relate to others, and ourselves and intentionally choosing compassionate thoughts and actions. The training process includes: daily meditation practices to develop loving-kindness, empathy and compassion; a two-hour weekly class that includes lecture, discussion, and in-class partner and small group listening and communication exercises; and homework assignments to practice compassionate thoughts and actions. Course Objectives include: develop a compassionate mind & heart; cultivate compassion for others; develop appreciation of others; make a positive difference in the lives of your patients and loved ones; and understand that compassion is a process that unfolds in response to suffering.

Note: Method of Evaluation includes attendance at weekly sessions, completion of homework assignments, and quality of participation in class.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

IDEP 835. Mind-Body Medicine2 Units

Grading Basis: Pass/Fail

Description: First-year elective. This eight-week course, consisting of eight, two-hour sessions, plus independent study and practice, will focus on Mind-Body Medicine approaches, including meditation, guided imagery, biofeedback, breathing techniques, art and movement, all of which are skills that can alleviate stress and foster self-awareness and self-care. The purpose of this elective is to introduce a variety of mind-body medicine modalities to medical students so that they can experience them and gain insights into the personal and professional applications of these techniques. Students will meet weekly with two faculty facilitators and will learn the techniques, practice them and discuss their experiences with members of the group. Students will have an opportunity for individual attention and instruction and for sharing what they are learning about mind-body medicine and themselves. Students will be expected to practice skills taught on their own for 20 minutes/day, five (5) days a week. Recommended readings will be distributed.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

IDEP 871. Biostatistics and Evidence-Based Medicine2.5 Units

Grading Basis: Pass/Fail

Description: This course creates a scientific framework for medical students to understand the processes of medical research design, data collection, analysis, and application to patient care. Lecture, TBL, flipped classrooms, and online self-instructional modules with self-assessment quizzes are used over this two-week course to teach and apply the concepts core to these skills and give students formative feedback on their learning.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

IDEP 880. Longitudinal Ambulatory Clinic2 Units

Grading Basis: Pass/Fail

Description: This course offers second-year students early exposure to the clinical practice of medicine under the supervision of community physicians in practice. The course teaches students to apply their medical knowledge and physical exam skills to diagnosing and treating patients at free community clinics. In this pilot version of the course, approximately half of the class will participate.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

IDEP 881. Bilingual Standardized Patient, Spanish-English1 Unit

Grading Basis: Pass/Fail

Prerequisite(s): Second-year standing.

Description: Perform standardized patient visits in Spanish including history & physical exams with a bilingual standardized patient.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

IDEP 882. Eat 2B Well Culinary Medicine2 Units

Grading Basis: Pass/Fail

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisite(s): Second-year standing.

Description: This eight-session course consists of two-hour sessions plus independent study and practice. The course will focus on developing a more extensive understanding of the impact of nutrition and healthy cooking on health and wellness. Students will learn about healthy food choices while practicing food preparation techniques. A primary purpose of this elective is to teach medical students to be aware of their own dietary intake and will be taught in such a way as to promote student learning around patient discussions pertaining to diet and lifestyle changes and improved nutrition.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

IDEP 883. Procedure Skills2 Units

Grading Basis: Pass/Fail

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Description: This elective course offers second-year students early exposure and opportunity to practice clinical procedures that are likely to be seen and used during clinical training. This course teaches students to apply medical knowledge to clinical simulations and to correctly perform procedural interventions via medical simulators.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

IDEP 901. Directed Studies1-5 Units

Grading Basis: Credit/No Credit

Description: Directed Studies is a variable-hour course designed to offer additional academic support to students preparing for the USMLE licensing exams. To be eligible, students must be identified by the Student Affairs Office or the Office of Undergraduate Medical Education as needing such course in order to fulfill the graduation requirement of passing USMLE Step 1 and Step 2.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

IDEP 911. Global Health Medicine I2-4 Units

Description: Many medical students seek opportunities to expand their knowledge of disease, treatments, culture and health care systems through global health experiences. This elective offers a route to receive service learning credit by working in a new healthcare delivery model and completing a reflective piece at the end of the experience. This will prepare the student for experiences abroad focusing on the ethical considerations of global health and a post trip debriefing to ensure the student has the opportunity to reflect and identify strengths and weaknesses of the experience. Students must complete pre-departure forms 3 months prior to departure and proposed countries for study must be approved by the administration.

Note: Method of Evaluation includes the following: 1) Prior to departure each student must complete the pre-departure lectures and score at least a 70% on post-lecture quizes to show comprehension; 2) the student must complete a patient log and submit to trip physician leader or advisor; 3) a reflection piece is required to be submitted to trip leader upon return.

Course Attribute(s): CBL - This course includes Community-Based Learning (CBL). Students will engage in a community experience or project with an external partner in order to enhance understanding and application of academic content.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

IDEP 912. Business of Medicine2 Units

Prerequisite(s): Fourth-year standing.

Description: Physicians must understand the business aspects of medical practice in order to effectively meet the practice challenges of a changing healthcare environment. They must understand healthcare as a system, how it is financed and how resources are managed. In the elective, students will work to establish a mock medical practice encompassing various issues and challenges that physicians encounter. Through didactic sessions, independent learning, small group discussions and one-on-one advising, students will examine the relevance of various issues to their medical practice and develop skills to address them. Students will gain knowledge and insight into the various professional and financial challenges raised in starting and managing a medical practice; gain knowledge of the various forms of managed care and how this form of healthcare delivery is evolving and its effect on a medical practice; will understand the cost of running a practice, including the relevance of RVU's, collection rate, payer mix, managed care contracting and optimal personnel planning; will understand the roles of other members of the healthcare team and be able to work effectively and collaboratively with them; and will be able to apply basic principles of continuous quality improvement to their medical practice.

Note: Method of Evaluation includes that students are expected to attend all didactic sessions, participation, individual self-reflective composition, and a final presentation to class on a relevant business of medicine topic of their choice.
Note: This elective is no longer available.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

IDEP 913. Medical Education1-16 Units

Prerequisite(s): Fourth-year standing.

Description: Students will learn some of the basic tenets involved in teaching and evaluation. Students will become familiar with basic educational principles by reading a set of core medical education articles. The student will be assigned to teach a set of students while being observed by a medical educator who will provide formative feedback on the performance. The student will develop a curriculum project using the curriculum quality improvement project model and expose the student to unique challenges of teaching and evaluating undergraduate medical education. Students will develop & critique a standardized patient case and a behavioral checklist to evaluate learners; develop and critique a human patient simulation case and a behavioral checklist to evaluate learners; develop and critique a didactic lecture using medical education tenets that will maximize the learner's educational experience; describe in general terms the idea of continuous quality improvement; describe the types of skills academic physicians should master; and describe some of the teaching, learning and evaluation challenges that are unique to undergraduate medical education.

Note: Method of Evaluation includes the following: observation of teaching, presentation, and evaluation of standardized patient case; small-group educational activity; human patient simulator case or large group instructional session project using the curriculum quality improvement project model to the staff of the Office of Medical Education.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

IDEP 914. Career Exploration1-4 Units

Description: Second- and third-year elective. This is a one-, two-, three-, or four-week experience. Choosing a specialty is one of the most difficult, but important, decisions a student will ever make. This course will create opportunities for students to gain insight into the problem content, patient population, practice setting and the daily practice experiences in a career field that interest them. The course will provide a career planning framework that students can use to determine whether a field would be a suitable career fit for their professional and personal goals.

Note: Method of Evaluation requires that students will submit a reflective paper on their experience.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

IDEP 916. Palliative Medicine1-16 Units

Prerequisite(s): Fourth-year standing.

Description: This is a required one-week experience in fourth year. Students join a multidisciplinary Palliative Medicine team that provides a unique educational experience emphasizing the opportunities and challenges of caring for seriously ill and/or dying patients. Determining goals of care for patients and therapies to relieve suffering and/or to improve quality of life will be discussed in depth. Students will participate in patient consultations where they will be expected to identify all palliative care issues-medical, psychosocial, ethical and discharge planning; attend daily teaching rounds; research topics for team discussion; and attend weekly Palliative Medicine Thursday afternoon Conference. The conference will include Journal Club and reflective writing/journaling. Methods of Evaluation includes: regular attendance at all conferences, teaching, and patient care activities; faculty will continually assess the student's skill in patient care assessment, with a focus on symptom and psychosocial data gathering and the student's skill in developing care plans that match the clinical needs and patient-oriented goals. Evaluation of clinical knowledge, skills and attitude is by observation of performance by faculty preceptors. Students must achieve a minimum of 75 on their clinical evaluations and participation in all required activities and conferences to pass this course.

Course Attribute(s): CBL - This course includes Community-Based Learning (CBL). Students will engage in a community experience or project with an external partner in order to enhance understanding and application of academic content.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

IDEP 919. Campus Health Services1-16 Units

Grading Basis: Pass/Fail

Prerequisite(s): Fourth-year standing.

Description: This is a two, three or four-week elective. Students participate in the evaluation and treatment of patients at the Belknap Health Center. Students will learn basic primary care medicine in the unique population. Students will gain experience in primary care medical skills for the diagnosis of both acute and chronic illnesses, understand management of contraception options including emergency contraception, gain experience in the diagnosis, management and prevention of sexually transmitted infections, understand role of health promotions, PEACC, psychiatry and counseling in this population, gain experience and understanding of travel medicine needs for this population and experience and understand public health role of CHS for the University.

Note: Method of Evaluation includes subjective evaluation of clinical performance and a short presentation on a topic related to campus health.
Note: This rotation is no longer available.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

IDEP 921. Medical Students as Teachers1-4 Units

Prerequisite(s): Fourth-year standing.

Description: This two- or four-week elective provides students with an opportunity to develop skills by teaching first-, second-, or third-year medical students. The elective consists of a required half-day orientation, held in July of the fourth year. All students must commit to attending this program to enroll in this elective. Each student must select one track in which to participate; each track is associated with a class/clerkship or teaching case-based integrative sessions in the ICC's. Depending upon the track, students will be required to attend at least one training session and document 8-10 hours of actual teaching. Course hours will be as follows: orientation (5 hours); training (2-4 hours); preparation (16-20 hours); and actual teaching (8-10 hours). Goals & Objectives: Expand communication and leadership skills by active participation in teacher training and teaching; develop teaching skills by observing, coaching and direct teaching of medical students and participating in teacher education activities; and enhance professional attributes by serving as a role model for medical students. Method of Evaluation Evaluation of student mastery of course objectives will be determined by each course director track leader. At a minimum, evaluation will consist of evaluation of student teaching skills through direct observation by the course director or his/her designee; student evaluations; completion of all required course activities and self evaluations. No student will receive a passing grade without satisfactory teaching evaluations and documentation of the minimum number of required teaching hours.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

IDEP 922. Longitudinal Ambulatory Rotation1-4 Units

Prerequisite(s): Fourth-year standing.

Description: AR Selective. This is a required fourth-year rotation that takes the place of the four-week ambulatory rotation. There will be two-week block of time to initiate the clerkship followed by 20 weeks of half days for a total equivalent to 4 weeks. Students need to be better prepared to practice in the ambulatory setting when they complete medical school and residency and this clerkship is designed to help prepare the students for competencies related to ambulatory care. Learning of certain program objectives not covered in other parts of the curriculum can be designed to occur optimally in the ambulatory setting. The rotation will include demonstration of competencies related to both clinical specialty and program objectives. The learning objectives and evaluations will be a shared partnership between the participating specialties and the central curriculum office. Medical knowledge, clinical skills and attitudes related to the specialty will be the responsibility of the discipline, and the medical knowledge, skills and attitudes related to non-discipline specific program objectives will be the responsibility on the curriculum office. Goals & Objectives: Taking on primary responsibility for the patient; focusing histories, physicals, and oral and written communication appropriately; sharing information effectively with a patient and family; prioritizing and organizing work effectively; anticipating what a patient will need during the course of hospitalization and communicating this information effectively in hand-overs; re-evaluating a patient when you take on their care and looking further when the clinical picture does not fit; continuing to think about and re-assess the patient during the course of the day; coping with uncertainty in patient care issues; functioning as a "team player" with residents, attendings, nurses, ancillary staff and all others involved in the care of the patient and coordinating the care of your patient.

Note: Method of Evaluation includes evaluation of clinical performance (70% of course grade); Scholarly Project evaluation (25% of course grade); and attendance for the non-clinical seminars (5% of course grade).

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

IDEP 923. Distinction in Research1-8 Units

Description: This is one of several educational tracks, which the goal is to provide a small group of medical students with meaningful and productive research experiences that will enrich their medical school training. The DIR will be longitudinal and will include contact with mentors and research groups, development of research-oriented skills, and the completion of a research project in the clinical years. This program will be coordinated by the HSC Office of Research under the direction of the SOM Associate Dean for Research. This elective will provide students a block of time in their 4th year to conduct hypothesis driven research as partial fulfillment of the DIR track. The time will be spent under the supervision of their individual DIR mentor and will conclude with a "product" which can be presented in one of several avenues for the dissemination of research. The role of clinician as researcher and the methods of basic and translational research will be taught throughout the DIR track. Goals: Students will learn critical thinking and problem solving skill; will gain knowledge of the mechanisms of disease through research and how to apply it to the clinical practice; will learn study design, data collection, management, and analysis; and will learn to give oral and written presentations of their work.

Note: Method of Evaluation: Mento evaluation, completion of student logs and completion of the research project as defined by the DIR curriculum.
Note: Grading will be Pass/Fail.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

IDEP 924. Topics in Clinical Medicine0.5 Units

Description: Fourth-year requirement. The goal of this course is to address topics in clinical medicine that are felt to be important from a central medical school educational perspective, but which are not covered in any existing clinical clerkships. The course is intended to fill educational gaps in the clinical years. The main instructional format will be short didactic presentations to support independent student reading and small group discussion. Goals & Objectives: Define and describe key concepts related to societally important topics in medicine; apply basic science principles to patient care and decision-making; and describe key aspects of modern patient management in selected clinical topics areas.

Note: Method of Evaluation includes: students will received a single grade based on the content of all sessions; attendance; small group participation; and completion of all required quizzes.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

IDEP 925. Health Equity Learning Project (HELP) for Community1-6 Units

Description: This experiential primary care outreach model for basic medical services provides diverse cultural exposure to UL medical students with the Louisville community as a teaching laboratory. Learning goals of personal growth, academic learning, and civic learning will be formally incorporated as students consider how social determinants of health onsite in the environment in which their patients are born, grow up, live, work, and age, as well as, the systems put in place to deal with illness--their medical home. This exploration will consider disparate populations of race, ethnicity, age, gender, sexual orientation, cultural orientation, geographic location, education, and income. Student self-discovery through emotional intelligence and innate bias assessments will be incorporated into effective patient communication competencies, as students teach health literacy for identified chronic diseases in a non-medical setting. Student skill sets in taking blood pressure, glucose measurements, peak flows, and obesity determinations will be reviewed prior to patient engagement. Patient clinical data (blood pressures, glucose readings, peak flows, weights, etc.) will be transmitted to the patient's identified medical home that day by written reports. Community tours of affected neighborhoods will be part of the elective as students gain appreciation of the patient's residential resource-poor areas. The most common chronic diseases affecting Louisville populations will be discussed in didactic format using Louisville Metro Health Equity Report: The Social Determinants of Health in Louisville Metro Neighborhoods, as well as, Health Louisville 2020: Creating a Healthier City. The final project will be a reflexive writing piece using the DEAL (D-Describe E-Examine AL-Articulate Learning) model of Critical Reflective Learning with a problem-solving scenario generated from patient exposure. Students may participate in a community mapping activity, community motor tour, as well as, an individual poverty simulation project.

Course Attribute(s): CBL - This course includes Community-Based Learning (CBL). Students will engage in a community experience or project with an external partner in order to enhance understanding and application of academic content.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

IDEP 926. Advanced Clinical Medicine1 Unit

Grading Basis: Pass/Fail

Prerequisite(s): Second-year standing.

Description: A required, third-year course that emphasizes a practical understanding of medical system and patient care topics that cross all specialties. The course uses a combination of didactic and small group instruction methods. Topics covered include: Patient Safety, Quality Improvement, Complementary/Alternative/Integrative Health, Global Health, Health Advocacy, Community Health, Palliative Care, Medical Negligence and Liability, Inter-professional Care of Patients, and Medical System Financial Basics. Completion of this course is required to enroll in fourth-year medical student courses.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

IDEP 927. Global Health-Research2-4 Units

Grading Basis: Pass/Fail

Description: This course is meant to be used when students are traveling to an international site for the purpose of research (as opposed to clinical work). In these instances, the on-site preceptor may be anyone qualified to supervise research including MDs, DOs, PhDs and other approved to be site leaders for IRB-approved research projects. A UofL faculty will still be assigned to the student, whether or not the faculty is personally involved with the research, to assure that the student's protocol and travel plans meet university requirements.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

IDEP 928. Global Health II2-4 Units

Grading Basis: Pass/Fail

Description: This course title is meant to be used by upper-level medical students traveling to international sites to perform clinical work. Students may have completed Global Health I prior to this course, but this is not required. Students must complete or refresh their pre-departure training and apply through the Global Education Office and International Center. Students will work with an assigned mentor to develop individual learning goals for their rotation and review these goals again in debriefing. The location and clinical activities will be determined by the student's desires but will need to be approved by their rotation mentor.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

IDEP 929. Global Health International Academic Experience2-4 Units

Grading Basis: Pass/Fail

Description: This course title is meant to be used when students enroll in an international medical school for course work at a foreign university. In this instance, UofL faculty are not needed as on-site preceptors, but a UofL faculty will be assigned to help the student develop his/her own goals for the rotation and to ensure that all travel associated paperwork and academic work is completed. The student must identify a local MD or equivalent as an on-site preceptor to get credit. The rotation in which they enroll may be clinical or classroom work only.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

IDEP 930. Global Health: Refugee Health Medicine2 Units

Prerequisite(s): Third-year standing.

Description: This elective will provide opportunities for medical students to learn about refugee health and the broad healthcare issues that are present in this population. The health conditions include communicable and non-communicable disease that and are interwoven with the many social determinants of health. Around 3,000 new refugees, adult and children, are settled in Kentucky every year and represent a growing population of diverse individuals. Caring for this population required population-specific knowledge including health conditions prevalent in differing refugee population. Through this elective, students will be able to see the many health conditions and needs represented in these populations and develop a framework and skill set for providing culturally tailored care.

Note: This elective is no longer available.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

IDEP 931. Developmental Medicine2-4 Units

Grading Basis: Pass/Fail

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisite(s): Fourth-year standing.

Description: This four-week elective will train fourth-year medical students in the care of individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities across the lifespan. Students enrolled in the elective will attend clinic at the Lee Specialty Clinic and will complete on-line modules created by the National Curriculum Initiative in Developmental Medicine. This unique interdisciplinary clinic serves all of the outpatient healthcare needs for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities and offers a variety of health care services, such as primary care, dentistry, psychiatry, clinical psychology, ophthalmology, neurology, behavioral analysis, crisis intervention and therapeutic services.

Note: Students must provide notice of 45 days before the scheduled start date to withdraw from this elective.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

IDEP 932. Koru Basic1 Unit

Grading Basis: Pass/Fail

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Description: This course explores science and practice of mindfulness as pathways to becoming stress resilient. Students learn to shift from reactive brain to creative brain, the key to responding wisely to life challenges. Students will be introduced to the practice of mindfulness and learn several skills, including meditation, for managing stress and enriching their lives. Mindfulness is about developing the ability to be fully attentive to all the moments of life, reducing the amount of time spent worrying about the future or fretting about the past. An important aspect of mindfulness is developing a non-judgmental, accepting, even curious attitude about one's moment-to-moment experiences. The more a person develops this attitude, the less they will feel overwhelmed by changes and challenges. Students will learn and implement methods to increase their flexibility and range of options for thinking, feeling and reacting to life's challenges and stressors. Mindfulness and mediation will be explored through in-class discussions and practice plus reading, daily practice, and reflective writing. By active participation in all dynamics of the course, students will gain increased stress resilience capacity.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

IDEP 933. Koru 2.01 Unit

Grading Basis: Pass/Fail

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisite(s): IDEP 932.

Description: Koru 2.0 is a mindfulness and meditation class, and is the "advanced" class for students who have already completed Koru Basic. Koru 2.0 builds on the skills developed in Koru Basic and provides an opportunity for students to further their practice and deepen their skills. Koru 2.0, like Koru Basic, emphasizes both meditation and mindfulness-based stress management skills. Koru 2.0 gives the students a chance to continue practicing the skills they learned in Koru Basic and to connect with other students in a supportive environment that encourages them to push their mindfulness abilities broader and deeper. Each class is 75 minutes in length.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

IDEP 934. Online Non-Clinical Elective2-4 Units

Grading Basis: Pass/Fail

Term Typically Offered: Occasionally Offered

Description: Online course offerings are offered at no charge to the student or home institution for qualified U.S. medical students in good standing to explore educational topics related to the healthcare system in a non-clinical setting. The topics are critical for improving the medical care system and include topics such as Global Health, Complementary and Integrative Healthcare, and Cultural Competency. Course offerings typically require participation by the student in a required number and frequency of didactic sessions, and completion of a written paper that is graded by the lead faculty member at the hosting medical school. These courses are all sponsored by national medical education associations such as the American Medical Association and are hosted by accredited schools of medicine. Participation in courses of this type cannot exceed four credit hours of the fourth year of medical school.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

IDEP 935. Law and Medicine4 Units

Grading Basis: Pass/Fail

Term Typically Offered: Spring Only

Description: This course will cover topics pertinent to law and medicine in today's society. The following topics will be covered by a variety of instructors, including lawyers as well as experts in the field of medical law: Introduction and Overview of Medicine and Law, patient care, types of healthcare providers, medicare, mental health, false claims/qui tam actions, fraud and abuse, Anti-Kickback statute, Stark Law, tax exemption and relates issues, how hospitals operate, medical staff issues, regulation of hospitals, licensure/CON, and many more topics.

Note: No more than 3 sessions can be missed, final essay.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes