Philosophy (PHIL)

Subject-area course lists indicate courses currently active for offering at the University of Louisville. Not all courses are scheduled in any given academic term. For class offerings in a specific semester, refer to the Schedule of Classes.

500-level courses generally are included in both the undergraduate- and graduate-level course listings; however, specific course/section offerings may vary between semesters. Students are responsible for ensuring that they enroll in courses that are applicable to their particular academic programs.

Course Fees

Some courses may carry fees beyond the standard tuition costs to cover additional support or materials. Program-, subject- and course-specific fee information can be found on the Office of the Bursar website.


PHIL 205. Introduction to Philosophy - AH3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101.

Description: This course introduces students to philosophical thinking through reading and discussion of philosophical texts focusing on ideas, questions, and arguments. Topics may include: What is existence and why do we exist? What is the meaning of life? What can we and what can't we know? What is language and must we mean what we say? What is the right thing to do? What is the ideal society to live in? What is beauty? What is joy?

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 206. Introduction to Philosophy through Literature and Film - AH3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Description: Study of central philosophical problems using literary and cinematic works, as well as traditional philosophical texts.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 207. Diverse Perspectives in Philosophy - D2, AH3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Description: Survey of historical canonical contributions to western philosophy juxtaposed with minority voices to understand how social, economic, and cultural situatedness affect bodies of knowledge.

Note: Cross-listed with WGST 207 and PAS 207.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 208. Science Fiction and Philosophy - AH3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Description: Introduction to philosophical problems, philosophers, and methods through works of science fiction.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 209. The Good Life - AH3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Description: Introduction to philosophical problems, philosophers, and methods through an investigation into the good life.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 211. Critical Thinking - AH3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Description: Introduction to and practice in methods of critical thinking, including argument identification, construction and revision; assessment of evidence; and critique of reasoning.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 219. Philosophy of Love, Sex, and Sexuality - D1, AH3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Description: Critical study of philosophical questions about love, desire, gender, sexuality, sexual difference, and sexual identity.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 220. Readings in Ethics1 Unit

Grading Basis: Pass/Fail

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Prerequisite(s): Permission of Department.

Description: Students in this course will develop and apply critical thinking skills and knowledge of ethics to current issues including ideas of diversity and inclusion through the use of contemporary readings, media, and discussions of multiple viewpoints.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 222. Contemporary Moral Problems - AH3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Description: Moral aspects of current medical, legal, political, environmental and social problems and of proposed solutions.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 225. Business Ethics3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Description: Analysis of moral problems that arise in contemporary business practice and of the different ethical frameworks proposed to resolve them.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 300. Philosophy in Dialogue1 Unit

Grading Basis: Pass/Fail

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Description: A course where philosophy majors can engage in dialgue about the nature of philosophy, the practice of philosophy, and how philosophy can promote life-long success and well being.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 301. Philosophy in the Ancient Greek & Roman World3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall Only

Description: Survey of philosophical work produced by authors in the ancient Mediterranean basin, including contemporary Greece and Italy as well as Southern Europe, North Africa, and Western Asia. From the pre-Socratics through the neo-Platonists.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 302. Christian, Muslim, and Jewish Thought in the Middle Ages3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Occasionally Offered

Description: Comparative survey of major philosophical debates within and among three major European, Near-Eastern, and North African monotheistic philosophical traditions between the fall of Rome and the European Renaissance.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 303. Philosophy & the Rise of Modernity, 1492-18043 Units

Term Typically Offered: Spring Only

Description: An examination of the history and evolution of philosophical ideas from Renaissance to Enlightenment. The class focuses primarily on European philosophy but it may also include non-European sources.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 304. Philosophy and the Americas3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall Only

Description: This course surveys traditions of philosophical thought developed in North America and Latin America, from early Maya and Aztec civilizations to the present. It explores modes of thinking and ways of doing philosophy that are responsive to the unique problems of origins, migration, colonization, democracy, and race in the Americas. Many of these actively reject distinctions between academic writing, poetry, and activism. In particular, the course focuses on traditions of engaged philosophy that seek to develop new epistemological, moral, political, and aesthetic theories that capture the challenges and particularities of life in the Americas.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 305. Selected Topics3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall Only

Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or faculty consent; other prerequisites determined by the instructor, depending on topic.

Description: Examination of a selected topic in Philosophy.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 306. Nineteenth-Century European Philosophy3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall Only

Description: This course surveys the works of major philosophers from the late 18th and 19th centuries, such as Kant, Hegel, Marx, and Nietzsche. May include engagement with these thinkers in neighboring regions such as the Middle East and North Africa.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 307. Philosophical Problems of the 20th Century3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Spring Only

Description: Study of major questions and problems of twentieth-century philosophy. Topics may include: truth and meaning; realism and positivism; existentialism and phenomenology; postmodernism; science and technology; personal identity; feminism and gender; race and racism; as well as questions in aesthetics and philosophy of culture.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 308. Freedom, Equality, Justice, and Community - SB3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall Only

Description: Introduction to central ideas and debates of social and political philosophy. Special emphasis on the relationship between ideals of justice and realities of social institutions & social change.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 311. Introduction to Logic3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Description: Introduction to formal and informal techniques of argument analysis, with emphasis on applications to ordinary language.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 315. Asian Philosophy - AH, D23 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall Only

Description: In alternating years, this course explores a variety of philosophical questions as discussed by South Asian philosophers (including those from areas now called India, Pakistan, Nepal, and Tibet) and East Asian philosophers (including those from areas now called China, Japan, and Korea). These questions include: What is real, what is the nature of things, and what is the self? How do we know what we know, and how do we prove something to other rational thinkers? What is right, what is wrong, and why? What is human nature like, and how fixed is it? How should we live, especially in light of human morality? How should the state be arranged in order to facilitate human and the natural world's flourishing? May be repeated once for credit when topic changes.

Note: Cardinal Core credit may be earned for this course only once for a total of 3 credit hours.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 318. Feminist Philosophy - AH, D13 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall Only

Description: An intersectional approach to theoretical and applied issues in classical and contemporary feminist philosophy.

Note: Cross-listed with WGST 360.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 319. Philosophy of Race and Racism - D1, AH3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Spring, Summer

Description: A critical examination of philosophical issues involved in interdisciplinary inquires into race and racism.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 320. Death3 Units

Description: Critical studies of the treatment of death in major philosophies, including a survey of classical viewpoints, but emphasizing contemporary writings.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 321. Ethics3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Description: Leading theories of moral responsibility, how to be a good person, and the nature of the good life.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 323. Medical Ethics3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Description: Analysis of codes of ethics and concepts of ethical practice in the profession of medicine; historical developments, contemporary problems, and case studies.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 325. Feminist Medical Ethics - D1, AH3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Description: Analysis of codes of ethics and concepts of ethical practice in the profession of medicine through a feminist framework; historical developments, contemporary problems, and case studies.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 327. Philosophy of Disability3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall Even Years

Description: Philosophical dimensions of disability, including implications for well-being, identity, policy, and bioethics. Examination of how disability challenges traditional views in philosophy, questions assumptions regarding "normality." and opens new areas for ethical, social, and political thought. Overview of philosophical debates on the treatment of people with disabilities, the allocation of healthcare resources, and the role of disability in shaping notions of justice. Addresses practical challenges faced by individuals with disabilities, such as stigmatization and discrimination, and explores the interplay of disability with other social identities like race, gender, and sexual orientation.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 328. Environmental Ethics3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Spring Odd Years

Description: Examination of the moral status of the natural environment and ethical problems in the relationship between people and planet. Particular focus on topical issues such as climate change, environmental justice, animal rights, and loss of living kinds.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 331. Philosophy of the Arts3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Description: Exploration of the ethical, emotional, psychological, and cultural significance of art and aesthetic experience, with emphasis on contemporary issues.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 341. Philosophy of Language - WR3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall Only

Description: Examines the philosophical problems associated with meaning in language.

Note: Cross-listed with LING 341.
Note: Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR).

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 345. Philosophy of Religion3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Description: Problems concerning religious knowledge, the existence and nature of God, and human destiny.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 350. Philosophy of Law3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall Only

Description: Classical through contemporary perspectives on the nature of law and its role in society and politics. Analysis encompasses the nature and justification of civil as well as criminal law, and the limits of law in public and private life. Particular attention to contemporary problems.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 356. Knowledge & Reality - WR3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Prerequisite(s): Two courses in philosophy or faculty consent.

Description: Study of such fundamental concepts as truth, knowledge, being, essence, existence, substance, process, change, space, time, eternity, matter, mind, self, value, and cause.

Note: Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR).

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 357. Philosophy of the Self3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Spring Only

Description: Survey of leading theories of the nature of selfhood, identity, and the I, with emphasis on how these theories interact with social and political issues.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 360. Technology and Human Values - AH3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Description: This course will explore the philosophical dimensions of technology, with special attention to ethical questions in the use and development of technology, and ethical implications of technological change.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 385. Introduction to Existentialism3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Occasionally Offered

Description: A broad survey of existential thought as expressed in philosophical and literary sources.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 401. Philosophy Internship3 Units

Grading Basis: Pass/Fail

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Description: Application of academic training in an organizational context. Faculty consent required.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 412. Symbolic Logic3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Occasionally Offered

Description: This is a first course in formal reasoning. Students will learn to symbolize and evaluate deductive arguments

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 427. Philosophy and the Environment3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Occasionally Offered

Description: Philosophical investigation of key aspects of human/environment interaction and issues that arise for human social relations within social-ecological systems. Emphasis on recent scholarly work. Course may be repeated for credit with consent of instructor and advisor, provided topics and readings have changed.

Note: Cross-listed with PHIL 627.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 458. Mind and Brain: Introduction to Cognitive Science3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Spring Odd Years

Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing (for PHIL 658 only).

Description: Introduction to the philosophy of cognitive science, an interdisciplinary approach to the study of cognition and intelligence that synthesizes research from psychology, computer science, linguistics, neuroscience, and philosophy. Course examines the foundations and prospects of cognitive science and grapples with philosophical questions that arise in cognitive science research.

Note: Cross-listed with PHIL 658.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 459. Philosophy of Technology3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall Odd Years

Prerequisite(s): For students enrolled in 459: junior standing or consent of instructor.

Description: No prerequisites for students enrolled in 659. The course explores the nature of technology, the historical role it has played in society, and the ethical implications of various technologies, even ones that aim to alleviate conditions or improve our lives. This course focuses on a diverse set of questions: What is technology? How should we understand its relation to nature and humanity? What is the relation of science to technology, and what can we learn about one from the other? What is the impact of technology on society? Where is technology beneficial, and where is it problematic? What is the impact of technology on human lives?Credit may not be earned for both PHIL 459 and PHIL 659, except with consent of program director and professor.

Note: Cross-listed with PHIL 659.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 499. Senior Honors Thesis - WR3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

Prerequisite(s): Senior standing; admission to department Honors Program.

Description: An intensive examination of a topical area in philosophy undertaken with a designated faculty director.

Note: Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR).

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 501. Independent Study1-3 Units

Description: Opportunity for the student, under the supervision of a sponsoring faculty member, to pursue individualized study related to research or practice that is not included in regular courses in the curriculum.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 502. Philosophy Capstone Seminar - CUE3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Occasionally Offered

Prerequisite(s): 24 hours of PHIL courses; major in Philosophy.

Description: Seminar with variable content consisting in sustained and rigorous primary philosophical study and reflection; required of all philosophy majors as close to graduation as feasible.

Course Attribute(s): CUE - This course fulfills the Culminating Undergraduate Experience (CUE) requirement for certain degree programs. CUE courses are advanced-level courses intended for majors with at least 90 earned credits/senior-level status.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 505. Selected Topics1-3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisite(s): To be determined by instructor, in the light of the topic chosen for that semester.

Description: Intensive investigation of one or more topics in Philosophy. May be repeated for credit when topic changes.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 516. African-American Philosophy3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Occasionally Offered

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 205 or PHIL 303 or PHIL 304.

Description: Analysis of works and theories of major recent and contemporary African-American philosophers within the themes of Pan-African debates.

Note: Cross-listed with PAS 516.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 518. Feminist Philosophical Literature3 Units

Prerequisite(s): Junior standing.

Description: Examination of central works by feminist philosophers in such subdisciplines as ethics, political philosophy, and epistemology.

Note: Cross-listed with WGST 560.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 519. Topics in Philosophy of Race and Racism3 Units

Description: Focused examination of philosophical issues involved in interdisciplinary inquires into the nature and functioning of race and racism.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 521. Ethical Theory - WR3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall Even Years

Prerequisite(s): One course in ethics or consent of instructor.

Description: Leading moral theories and contemporary debates in philosophical ethics.

Note: Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR).

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 528. Philosophy of Mind3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Occasionally Offered

Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or consent of instructor.

Description: Focuses on philosophical questions concerning the nature of mind. Central topics include the relation between mind and matter, and the nature of consciousness.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 529. Philosophy of Emotions3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Occasionally Offered

Prerequisite(s): One course in philosophy or consent of instructor.

Description: A philosophical study of the nature of emotions. The course often also includes an examination of emotions' relationship to cognition and behavior, and of their moral, political, and aesthetic values.

Note: Cross-listed with PHIL 629.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 531. Aesthetics3 Units

Description: An examination of philosophical theories of art, works of art, creative activity, and aesthetic experience, from Plato to the present.

Note: Credit may not be earned for both PHIL 531 and PHIL 631.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 535. Political Philosophy3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Occasionally Offered

Prerequisite(s): Two courses in philosophy and/or political science.

Description: Theories of political forms and ideals, and core concepts in political life, such as justice, freedom, and equality. Attention to how ideals may be realized or frustrated.

Note: Credit may not be earned for both PHIL 535 and PHIL 635.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 536. Philosophy of Science3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Occasionally Offered

Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or consent of instructor.

Description: This course provides an introduction to the main philosophical questions concerning scientific knowledge and methodology.

Note: Cross-listed with BETH 636.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 538. Critical Social Theory3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Occasionally Offered

Description: Critical Theory examines the relation between conceptual thinking and concrete social reality. It focuses on concepts such as social justice, freedom, progress, identity, and culture by studying their real-life meanings and implications. This course focuses on the school of thought known as the "Frankfurt School" as well as on its legacy and significance for feminism, gender and queer theory, and critical philosophy of race.

Note: Cross-listed with SCHG 538.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 540. Epistemology - WR3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Occasionally Offered

Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or consent of instructor.

Description: This course focuses on philosophical questions concerning knowledge and belief. It will examine such issues as how beliefs are acquired and justified, the possible limits to knowledge, and issues of epistemic justice.

Note: Approved for the Arts and Sciences upper-level requirement in written communication (WR).
Note: Credit may not be earned for both PHIL 540 and PHIL 640.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 541. Recent Topics in the Philosophy of Language3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Occasionally Offered

Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or consent of instructor Current theory and research in the philosophy of language.

Description: Note: cross-lists with PHIL 641 and LING 641

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 557. African Philosophy3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Occasionally Offered

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 301, or PHIL 302, or PHIL 303, or PHIL 304.

Description: Descriptive and analytical introduction to the ideas and themes in African philosophy through careful readings of texts which address a cluster of topics.

Note: Cross-listed with PAS 557.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 572. Phenomenology3 Units

Prerequisite(s): PHIL 303 or consent of instructor.

Description: The development of the phenomenological method and its use from Husserl to the present.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 580. Foundations of Bioethics3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall Odd Years

Prerequisite(s): Restricted to graduate students.

Description: Grounding in the major theories and methods of bioethical decision-making, including contemporary controversies about the role of theory, principles, cases, narrative, and virtues.

Note: Cross-listed with BETH 680 and PHIL 680.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 581. Current Controversies in Health Care Ethics3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall Odd Years

Prerequisite(s): Restricted to graduate students.

Description: Topics in health care ethics currently attracting the most attention in both professional and public discussions. A variety of viewpoints on these topics will be considered.

Note: Cross-listed with BETH 681 and PHIL 681.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 582. Health and Social Justice3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall Even Years

Prerequisite(s): Admission into Bioethics MA program, or consent of instructor.

Description: An interdisciplinary approach to a wide array of issues pertaining to health and health care that arise at the intersection of gender, race, sex, disability, class, and culture.

Note: Cross-listed with PHIL 682, WGST 682, BETH 682, WGST 582.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 583. Health Care, Justice & Community3 Units

Prerequisite(s): One Philosophy course at 300-level or above, or consent of instructor.

Description: Examines theories of justice and equality as they apply to issues in health care delivery, considers explanations for why disparities exist, and the practical ways that communities have addressed inequalities.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 584. Clinical Ethics3 Units

Prerequisite(s): For BETH 684: Admission to a graduate program in Applied Philosophy or Health Care Ethics, or consent of instructor.

Description: For PHIL 684: Junior standing or consent of instructor. Application of ethical principles, virtues, and cases in the context of clinical care, with a practical approach toward ethics consultation and conflict resolution.Credit may not be earned for more than one of PHIL 684, PHIL 684, and BETH 684, except by consent of instructor and program director.

Note: Cross-listed with BETH 684 and PHIL 684.

Course Attribute(s): CBL - This course includes Community-Based Learning (CBL). Students will engage in a community experience or project with an external partner in order to enhance understanding and application of academic content.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 590. Philosophical Foundations of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall Only

Description: This course will provide an overview of the theory and practice of diversity. Diversity is understood as the many sociocultural differences between individuals and the differences that those differences make for those individuals. In this course, we will explore the historical context of oppression, the oppression framework for understanding diversity, privilege, social identity, the role of the body in diversity, stereotypes, and the personal experiences of both those who are oppressed and those who are privileged. Students will also have a substantial opportunity to examine how these general themes impact their particular area of study, work, or interest.This is the core course for the Diversity Literacy Certificate. Students pursuing that certificate should enroll in PHIL 690.

Note: Cross-listed with PHIL 690.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 627. Philosophy and the Environment3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Occasionally Offered

Description: Philosophical investigation of key aspects of human/environment interaction and issues that arise for human social relations within social-ecological systems. Emphasis on recent scholarly work. Course may be repeated for credit with consent of instructor and advisor, provided topics and readings have changed.

Note: Cross-listed with PHIL 427.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 658. Mind and Brain: Introduction to Cognitive Science3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Spring Odd Years

Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing (for PHIL 458 only).

Description: Introduction to the philosophy of cognitive science, an interdisciplinary approach to the study of cognition and intelligence that synthesizes research from psychology, computer science, linguistics, neuroscience, and philosophy. Course examines the foundations and prospects of cognitive science and grapples with philosophical questions that arise in cognitive science research.

Note: Cross-listed with PHIL 458.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 659. Philosophy of Technology3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall Odd Years

Prerequisite(s): For students enrolled in 459: junior standing or consent of instructor.

Description: No prerequisites for students enrolled in 659. The course explores the nature of technology, the historical role it has played in society, and the ethical implications of various technologies, even ones that aim to alleviate conditions or improve our lives. This course focuses on a diverse set of questions: What is technology? How should we understand its relation to nature and humanity? What is the relation of science to technology, and what can we learn about one from the other? What is the impact of technology on society? Where is technology beneficial, and where is it problematic? What is the impact of technology on human lives?Credit may not be earned for both PHIL 459 and PHIL 659, except with consent of program director and professor.

Note: Cross-listed with PHIL 459.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes

PHIL 690. Philosophical Foundations of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion3 Units

Term Typically Offered: Fall Only

Description: This course will provide an overview of the theory and practice of diversity. Diversity is understood as the many sociocultural differences between individuals and the differences that those differences make for those individuals. In this course, we will explore the historical context of oppression, the oppression framework for understanding diversity, privilege, social identity, the role of the body in diversity, stereotypes, and the personal experiences of both those who are oppressed and those who are privileged. Students will also have a substantial opportunity to examine how these general themes impact their particular area of study, work, or interest.This is the core course for the Diversity Literacy Certificate. Students pursuing that certificate should enroll in PHIL 590.

Note: Cross-listed with PHIL 590.

For class offerings for a specific term, refer to the Schedule of Classes